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Black History Month: Black History Month

In honor of Black History Month this Research Guide will show what is available at the SVC library and online.

Books in the Library - click arrows for more

Children of Fire

Renowned historian Thomas C. Holt challenges the usual telling of history to tell the story of generations of African Americans through the lived experience of the subjects themselves, with all of the nuances, ironies, contradictions, and complexities one might expect.  Holt captures the entire African American experience from the moment the first twenty African slaves were sold  at Jamestown in 1619 to later movements.

We Shall Overcome: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Black freedom struggle

Revised versions of papers presented at a symposium held in October 1986 in Washington, D.C. 294 pages.

Racecraft

Most people assume that racism grows from a perception of human difference: the fact of race gives rise to the practice of racism. Sociologist Karen E. Fields and historian Barbara J. Fields argue otherwise: the practice of racism produces the illusion of race, through what they call "racecraft".

The New Jim Crow

Spawning a whole generation of criminal justice reform activists and organizations motivated by Michelle Alexander's unforgettable argument that "we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it." 

Martin Luther King : "I have a dream

King's entire inspirational speech in Washington D.C. on August 28, 1963.

Felon

Felon tells the story of the effects of incarceration in poems--canvassing a wide range of emotions and experiences through homelessness, underemployment, love, drug abuse, domestic violence, fatherhood, and grace--and, in doing so, creates a travelogue for an imagined life. 

The Color of Law

In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America's cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation--that is, through individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation--the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments--that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day. 

A Promised Land

 Barack Obama tells the story of his improbable odyssey from young man searching for his identity to leader of the free world, describing in strikingly personal detail both his political education and the landmark moments of the first term of his historic presidency--a time of dramatic transformation and turmoil. 

Say It Plain

A century of great African American speeches.

The Hill We Climb

On January 20, 2021, Amanda Gorman became the sixth and youngest poet to deliver a poetry reading at a presidential inauguration. Taking the stage after the 46th president of the United States, Joe Biden, Gorman captivated the nation and brought hope to viewers around the globe with her call for unity and healing. 

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