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Student Research Guide: False Information About Climate Change: Other Sources

by Ava Ronning

Other Sources

Aral, S. (2020, January) How We Can Protect Truth In the Age of Misinformation [Video]. TED Conferences. https://sbctc-skagit.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/01STATEWA_SKAGIT/hsm5hs/alma991000671906502822

This TED Talk shows how false news spreads and how it's done. This source isn’t specific to climate change, but I thought it was helpful to get a look into how news can spread misinformation or make things appear differently than it happened. Sinan Aral is an award-winning researcher and scientist with two master’s degrees- one from the London School of Economics and the other from Harvard. He also has a PhD from MIT.

 

Information Council on the Environment (1991). Internal coal strategy memo [Photograph] Union of Concerned Scientists. Retrieved from https://www.ucsusa.org/sites/default/files/attach/2015/07/The-Climate-Deception-Dossiers.pdf

The above image is a great primary source from one of my articles in "top resources". It is a coal company's strategy memo outlining plans to deceive the public. It comes from the Union of Concerned Scientists, an organization dedicated to providing a scientific perspective on environmental issues.

Kelly, J. (2021, January 19). "Misinformation" vs. "Disinformation": Get Informed On The Difference [Article]. Dictionary.com. Retrieved from https://www.dictionary.com/e/misinformation-vs-disinformation-get-informed-on-the-difference/

This source is not a reference source but it of acts like one. Throughout my research process, I recognized that there are two kinds of misinformation- the kind that is unintentional (misinformation) and the kind that is intentional (disinformation). They both fall under the false information umbrella but are different, and that's what this article taught me. I especially recommend this source because it gives clear examples. Dictionary.com is an online dictionary that takes its information from major published dictionaries, mainly the Random House Unabridged Dictionary.

MacNeil-Lehrer Productions (Producer) (2012).Teachers endure balancing act over climate change curriculum [Video file]. Retrieved from https://video.alexanderstreet.com/watch/teachers-endure-balancing-act-over-climate-change-curriculum

This source is about how high school students get pre existing ideas but have little knowledge about climate change and how this poses a challenge to teachers. Although this video was mainly focused on teachers in Colorado, I thought it provided a look into what misinformation looks like for students and why it’s difficult for teachers to correct. MacNeil-Lehrer Productions is a TV news program dedicated to unbiased news and is a part of PBS.

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